2013
Workshop
2-3 November

Trafficking in Human Beings: Modern Slavery

Trafficking in Human Beings: Modern Slavery

Prologue
Following a wish expressed by Pope Francis, the Pontifical Academies of Sciences and of the Social Sciences, together with FIAMC (World Federation of the Catholic Medical Associations) are organizing a preparatory workshop on 2-3 November 2013 in the Casina Pio IV to examine human trafficking and modern slavery, in order to establish the real status quo and an agenda to combat this heinous crime. For example, natural sciences today can provide new tools that can be used against this new form of slavery, such as a digital registry to compare the DNA of unidentified missing children (including cases of illegal adoption) with that of their family members who have reported their disappearance.

No one can deny that "the trade in human persons constitutes a shocking offence against human dignity and a grave violation of fundamental human rights" and is an accelerator of criminal wealth creation in this new century. The Second Vatican Council already stated that "slavery, prostitution, the selling of women and children, and disgraceful working conditions where people are treated as instruments of gain rather than free and responsible persons" are "infamies" which "poison human society, debase their perpetrators" and constitute "a supreme dishonour to the Creator". In one of the few documents of the Magisterium of the Popes on this issue, quoted at the beginning of these lines, the Blessed John Paul II added that "such situations are an affront to fundamental values which are shared by all cultures and peoples, values rooted in the very nature of the human person". Moreover, he affirmed that the topic is a central one for the social sciences and natural sciences, in the context of globalization. "The alarming increase in the trade in human beings is one of the pressing political, social and economic problems associated with the process of globalization; it presents a serious threat to the security of individual nations and a question of international justice which cannot

... Read all

Prologue
Following a wish expressed by Pope Francis, the Pontifical Academies of Sciences and of the Social Sciences, together with FIAMC (World Federation of the Catholic Medical Associations) are organizing a preparatory workshop on 2-3 November 2013 in the Casina Pio IV to examine human trafficking and modern slavery, in order to establish the real status quo and an agenda to combat this heinous crime. For example, natural sciences today can provide new tools that can be used against this new form of slavery, such as a digital registry to compare the DNA of unidentified missing children (including cases of illegal adoption) with that of their family members who have reported their disappearance.

No one can deny that "the trade in human persons constitutes a shocking offence against human dignity and a grave violation of fundamental human rights" and is an accelerator of criminal wealth creation in this new century. The Second Vatican Council already stated that "slavery, prostitution, the selling of women and children, and disgraceful working conditions where people are treated as instruments of gain rather than free and responsible persons" are "infamies" which "poison human society, debase their perpetrators" and constitute "a supreme dishonour to the Creator". In one of the few documents of the Magisterium of the Popes on this issue, quoted at the beginning of these lines, the Blessed John Paul II added that "such situations are an affront to fundamental values which are shared by all cultures and peoples, values rooted in the very nature of the human person". Moreover, he affirmed that the topic is a central one for the social sciences and natural sciences, in the context of globalization. "The alarming increase in the trade in human beings is one of the pressing political, social and economic problems associated with the process of globalization; it presents a serious threat to the security of individual nations and a question of international justice which cannot be deferred".

According to the recent UNODC 2012 Report on Trafficking, the UN started being aware of this increasing crime only in the year 2000, together with the emerging effects of globalization and subsequently drafted a Protocol to Prevent, Suppress and Punish Trafficking in Persons, Especially Women and Children, supplementing the United Nations Convention against Transnational Organized Crime, which has been signed by 117 parties. According to the 2012 Report, between 2002 and 2010 the International Labour Organization estimated "that 20.9 million people were victims of forced labour globally. This estimate also includes victims of human trafficking for labour and sexual exploitation" (p. 1). Each year, it is estimated that about 2 million people are victims of sexual trafficking, 60% of which are girls. Human organ trafficking reaches almost 1% of that figure, thus affecting around 20,000 people who are forced or deceived into giving up an organ (liver, kidney, pancreas, cornea, lung, even the heart), not without the complicity of doctors, nurses and other medical staff, who have pledged to follow Hippocrates’ oath Primum non nocere instead. But these chilling figures "represent only the tip of the iceberg, as criminals generally go to great lengths to prevent the detection of their activities" (p. 16). Some observers speculate that, within ten years, human trafficking will surpass drugs and weapons trafficking to become the most profitable criminal activity in the world. Recent trends, however, indicate that human trafficking is already in the first place, so that far from being a declining social crime, it is becoming ever more threatening. International sex trafficking is not limited to poor and undeveloped areas of the world – it is a problem in virtually every region of the globe. Countries with large (often legal) sex industries create the demand for trafficked women and girls, while countries where traffickers can easily recruit provide the supply. Generally, economically depressed countries provide the easiest recruitment for traffickers. The regions that produce the most sex trafficking victims are the former Soviet republics, Asia, and Latin America.

Because of the human and moral scandal they mean and interests involved, which lead to pessimism and resignation, many international institutions have turned their backs. This is why it is so important for the Pontifical Academies of Science and of the Social Sciences, together with the Federation of Catholic Medical Associations, to follow the Pope's wish directly, sine glossa. Today, against these new forms of slavery, we need to readopt the same attitude as the Catalan Jesuit St Peter Claver, who saw African slaves in Latin America as fellow Christians and, when he was solemnly professed in 1622, signed his final profession document in Latin as: Petrus Claver, aethiopum semper servus (Peter Claver, servant of the Africans forever). In short, this great Saint embodies the great Christian revolution, unknown to the Greeks and the Romans and to all of the previous civilizations, which began explicitly with the famous letter of St Paul to Philemon. Indeed, St Paul urges Philemon to consider Onesimus “no longer as a slave, but something much better than a slave, a dear brother”. In other words, as stated in the Second Vatican Council, in our times “everyone must consider his every neighbour without exception as another self, taking into account first of all His life and the means necessary to living it with dignity, so as not to imitate the rich man who had no concern for the poor man Lazarus”, by recalling the voice of the Lord, "As long as you did it for one of these the least of my brethren, you did it for me" (Mt. 25:40).

We must thus be grateful to Pope Francis for identifying one of the most important social tragedies of our times and having enough confidence in our Catholic institutions to instruct us to organize this workshop. As He said during the canonization of the Mexican St Guadalupe García Zavala, "this is called 'touching the flesh of Christ'. The poor, the abandoned, the sick and the marginalized are the flesh of Christ. And Mother Lupita touched the flesh of Christ and taught us this behaviour: not to feel ashamed, not to fear, not to find 'touching Christ’s flesh' repugnant. Mother Lupita had realized what 'touching Christ’s flesh' actually means". Pope Francis’ words are a clear response in the light of Jesus Christ’s message to this new form of contemporary slavery, which constitutes an abhorrent violation of the dignity and rights of human beings.

+ Marcelo Sánchez Sorondo
 

Read Less

Taller 2-3 noviembre – Prefacio: Respondiendo a un deseo del Papa Francisco, las Pontificias Academias de las Ciencias y de las Ciencias Sociales junto a la FIAMC (Federación Internacional de las Asociaciones de Médicos Católicos), están organizando un seminario preparatorio que se celebrará los días 2 y 3 de noviembre de 2013 en la Casina Pío IV y que abordará la trata de personas y la esclavitud moderna a los efectos de establecer el real estado de la situación y una agenda para combatir dicho horrible crimen. Por ejemplo, hoy la ciencia puede proveer contra esta nueva forma de esclavitud instrumentos antes desconocidos, tales como un registro informático del ADN para cotejar tanto los datos genéticos de los niños desaparecidos (incluso por adopciones ilegales) como los de los familiares que los reclaman.

A nadie se le ocurre negar hoy que «la trata de personas constituye un crimen escandaloso contra la dignidad humana y una violación grave de los derechos humanos fundamentales», además de ser un evidente acelerador de lucro criminal en nuestra centuria. Ya el Concilio Vaticano II establecía perentoriamente que «la esclavitud, la prostitución, la trata de blancas y de jóvenes, así como las condiciones laborales degradantes, que reducen al trabajador al rango de mero instrumento de lucro, sin respeto a la libertad y a la responsabilidad de la persona humana» son «infamantes» y «degradan la civilización humana, deshonran más a sus autores que a sus víctimas y son totalmente contrarias al honor debido al Creador». En uno de los pocos documentos del Magisterio Papal sobre este crimen, citado supra, el Beato Juan Pablo II añade: «tales situaciones son una afrenta a los fundamentales valores comunes a todas las culturas y pueblos, valores radicados en la naturaleza íntima de la persona humana». El horripilante incremento de este crimen –concluye el beato Papa – es un nuevo desafío para las ciencias sociales y naturales en el contexto de la hodierna globalización: «el alarmante crecimiento en la trata de seres humanos es uno de los problemas políticos, sociales y económicos más apremiantes asociados con el proceso de globalización; tal representa una amenaza seria a la seguridad de las naciones individuales y una cuestión de justicia internacional que no puede ser diferida».

Según el reciente informe UNODC 2012 Report on Trafficking, las Naciones Unidas empezaron a tomar seria conciencia de tal creciente crimen solamente a partir del año 2000, junto con los efectos negativos consecuentes a la globalización. Así, más recientemente establecieron un Protocolo para Prevenir, Reprimir y Sancionar la Trata de Personas, Especialmente Mujeres y Niños, firmado ya por 117 Estados partes, que complementa la Convención de las Naciones Unidas contra la Delincuencia Organizada Transnacional. Según el citado informe de 2012, entre 2002 y 2010 la Organización Internacional del Trabajo estima que «globalmente, 20,9 millones de personas fueron víctimas de trabajo forzado. Esta estadística incluye también las víctimas de la trata de personas para la explotación laboral y sexual» (pág. 1). Cada año se estima que alrededor de 2 millones de personas son víctimas del tráfico sexual, de las cuales el sesenta por ciento son niñas. El tráfico de órganos de seres humanos es casi el 1% de esta cifra. Luego afecta a unas 20.000 personas a las que con diferentes formas de engaño se les extraen, en forma ilegal, órganos como el hígado, el riñón, el páncreas, la cornea, el pulmón, inclusive el corazón, no sin la complicidad de médicos, enfermeros y demás personal, comprometidos con juramento en vez a seguir el principio de Hipócrates: Primum non nocere. Estas escalofriantes estadísticas «representan solamente la punta del iceberg, ya que los criminales generalmente hacen de todo para ocultar la detección de sus actividades» (p. 16). Algunos observadores sostienen que, en pocos años, la trata de personas superará el tráfico de drogas y de armas, y se convertirá así en la actividad criminal más lucrativa del mundo. Más aún, las recientes tendencias sitúan la trata alcanzando ya el primer lugar, por lo que lejos de ser un crimen social en retirada, tiene una presencia cada vez más amenazante. Tal trata sexual internacional no se limita a las zonas pobres y subdesarrolladas, sino que se extiende virtualmente a todas las regiones del globo. Mientras que los países con una vasta (y a menudo legal) industria sexual engendran la demanda de la trata de mujeres, jóvenes y niñas, los países económicamente deprimidos proporcionan mayormente el suministro. Es en estos últimos donde los traficantes pueden reclutar con mayor facilidad. Las regiones de origen de la mayoría de las víctimas de la explotación sexual son las antiguas repúblicas soviéticas, Asia y América Latina.

A causa de los enormes intereses implicados y del escándalo humano y degradación moral de tal trata, que llevan al pesimismo y a la resignación, las más veces las instituciones internacionales le dan la espalda. Muy por el contrario, las Academias Pontificias de las Ciencias y de las Ciencias Sociales, junto con la Federación de Asociaciones de Médicos Católicos, quieren hacer frente a este delito siguiendo directamente y sine glossa el deseo del Papa Francisco. Hoy, contra estas atroces formas de esclavitud queremos recuperar la venerable actitud del Jesuita Catalán San Pedro Claver, quien consideraba a los esclavos africanos en Latinoamérica como sus hermanos y amigos cristianos más íntimos. Tanto fue así que, cuando hizo su profesión solemne en 1622, firmó en Latín: Petrus Claver, aethiopum Semper servus (Pedro Clavier, siervo de los etiópicos para siempre). En síntesis, este gran Santo encarna la gran revolución del mensaje de Cristo, no conocida ni por los griegos ni por los romanos ni por ninguna otra civilización precedente, que comienza explícitamente con la epístola célebre a Filemón de San Pablo, donde le aconseja considerar a Onésimo «no ya como esclavo, sino como más que esclavo, como querido hermano». En otras palabras, debemos aseverar en nuestros días con el Concilio Vaticano II que «cada uno, sin excepción de nadie, debe considerar al prójimo como otro yo, cuidando en primer lugar de su vida y de los medios necesarios para vivirla dignamente, no sea que imitemos a aquel rico que se despreocupó por completo del pobre Lázaro». Debemos en definitiva hacernos cargo de las mismísimas exigentes palabras del Señor: «en la medida que lo hicieron con el más pequeño de mis hermanos, lo hicieron conmigo» (Mt 25,40).

Somos deudores al Papa Francisco que ha sabido identificar uno de los más dramáticos desafíos sociales de nuestra época y nos lo ha confiado, demostrando el aprecio que tiene por las instituciones católicas que organizan el seminario. Como él ha dicho durante la reciente canonización de la Santa mexicana Guadalupe García Zavala «esto se llama ‘tocar la carne de Cristo’. Los pobres, los abandonados, los enfermos, los marginados son la carne de Cristo. Y Madre Lupita tocaba la carne de Cristo y nos enseñaba esta conducta: no avergonzarnos, no tener miedo, no tener repugnancia a tocar la carne de Cristo. Madre Lupita había entendido qué significa eso de ‘tocar la carne de Cristo’». Estas palabras del Papa Francisco son la clara reacción desde el mensaje de Cristo a esta nueva forma de esclavitud contemporánea, que constituye una violación aberrante de la dignidad y de los derechos de las personas.

+ Marcelo Sánchez Sorondo

List of Participants

Card. Roger Etchegaray
Werner Arber
Marcelo Sánchez Sorondo
Antonio Battro
Margaret S. Archer
Juan J. Llach
Ombretta Fumagalli Carulli
Janne Haaland Matlary
Jeffrey Sachs
José María Simón Castellví
Melissa R. Holman
Marcelo Suárez-Orozco
Carola Suárez-Orozco
Myria Vassiliadou
Joy Ngozi Ezeilo
Francisco Barreiro Sanmartín
Nathalie Lummert
Ermanno Pavesi
María Inez Linhares de Carvalho
Henrietta Maria Williams
Gustavo Vera
José Antonio Lorente
Pierre Morel
Jorge Nery Cabrera Cabrera
William Lacy Swing
Anne T. Gallagher
Eugenia Bonetti